Jan W. Marcus

Retired civil engineer
Ars et Mathesis
Beverwijk, The Netherlands
During my professional life as a civil engineer I became interested in tensegrities. Also M.C. Escher’s impossible figures did have my interest. Combining tensegrities and impossible figures makes "impossible structures". Obviously for determining strength and stiffness of these solid structures, computers essential.
Same computer-models used in FEM-computer programs, can also be used to create Cylinder Anamorphosis. By translating and/or rotating these 3D models in a developed computer program, "impossible structures" become visible into the reflecting cylinder.

Cuboid
200 x 300 x 210 mm
Inkjet print / reflecting cylinder
2010
In the reflecting cylinder the impossible cuboid becomes visible.
The Wall III
200 x 300 x 210 mm
Inkjet print / reflecting cylinder
2010
In the reflecting cylinder Istvan Orosz's The Wall II becomes visible.
Arch
200 x 210 x 300 mm
Inkjet print / reflecting cylinder
2010
In the reflecting cylinder an impossible arch becomes visible