Professor of Art
Illinois State University
Normal, Illinois, USA
My work follows two primary directions: color-relativity functions and geometric composition. The color-relativity work examines the structures of simultaneous contrast illusions, whereby a constituent color appears to change its identity in different color contexts. Although this is a purely subjective perceptual experience, the principles by which the illusions function are objectively definable, and therefore manipulable by the artist. Usually I compose within a square format divided by Phi ratio, from which are developed rotational, translational, and reflective symmetries. Other geometric compositions are developed upon grids and are organized by sequences, combinations, and permutations of quantities, shape features, and colors. My studio work explores the boundaries and the overlaps between perceptual and conceptual orders, and mathematics consistently has been integral to that exploration.
For Zeno (Flowering)
14 x 14"
archival digital print
2010
4 iterations of progressive unfolding from the square; clockwise, beginning from right : 3/4's, 2/3's, 1/2's, 1/3's. 4 sequences of 4 hues (red-orange, violet, cyan, yellow) at 4 values (light, middle-light, middle-dark, dark); light values are adjacent to and dark values farthest from central square; each value stage of each hue rotated counter-clockwise around central square.
For Zeno (World Borders)
14 x 14"
archival digital print
2010
4 iterative divisions from the center lines to the edges of the square; clockwise, beginning from right : 1/3's, 1/2's, 2/3's, 3/4's. Color sequences from gray central axes to high intensity edges; clockwise, beginning from right : red-orange, blue-violet, cyan, yellow.
For Zeno (World Directions)
8.5 x 14"
archival digital print
2010
4 iterative expansions/contractions of 4 central violet rectangles; clockwise, beginning from top left: halving rectangle lengths with constant widths (halving areas); halving rectangle widths with constant lengths (halving areas); halving rectangle lengths + quadrupling widths (doubling areas); doubling rectangle widths with constant lengths (doubling areas).