Freelance artist
17 street Tímár
1034 Budapest, Hungary
The idea of immaterialisation I could only model in painting by using such elements as even in themselves represent the supremacy of pure sensation. Thus two basic suprematist elements, the square and the cross through which the square is divided into four parts, have served as points of departure. In this case, the square bears a yellow colour symbolising existence, whereas its opposite, the cross is characterised by a white tone that creates an impression of emptiness. During the construction of the picture, i.e. the deconstruction of the yellow square, I came to set up a polydimensional net. The net that connects micro- and macro-worlds, stretched in infinite dimension structures as a hyper-filter, incessantly attempts to jettison the imperfect objects (yellow squares) of existence from its ’body’.
The Seventh triptichon 1
100x100 cm
oil on canvas
1991
The Seventh 1991 (triptichon, oil on canvas, 100x100 cm each) The basis of this triptichon is a sequence of nested squares. These squares compose a well designed proportional system both in geometric and chromatic sense. Geometrically the edge of each nested square is the half of its framing square (a, 2a, 4a, 8a, 16a, 32a, 64a, i.e., 2(n-1)a) and, consequently, the areas of the consecutive framing surfaces form the sequence: (a2, 3a2, 12a2, 48a2, 192a2, 768a2, 3072a2, i.e., if n>1: [22(n-1)-22(n-2)]a2). The colour signatures assigned to each of the squares form a mathematical sequence, similar to the edge lengths, from a saturated claret outside to white inside. The individual units of the triptichon display proportional width stems starting from the sides of the inner squares...
The Seventh triptichon 2
100x100 cm
oil on canvas
1991
The Seventh 1991 (triptichon, oil on canvas, 100x100 cm each) ...There are two stems running down and three stems running up in the first unit. They originate from the 3rd and 5th squares (numbered from inside), and from the 2nd, 4th and 6th respectively. This means, one from each square, alternately up and down, with the exception of the central and, naturally, the outer squares. The stems keep the colour and the width of the nested frame of the squares they originate from. Thus, they display the width proportions whose scale was fixed by the lengths of the nested squares’ edges. Note the harmony, that the brightness of the lines originating from the inner squares optically balances their more narrow width. The second unit of the triptichon extends the stem system developed for the first unit. The stems are reflected to the main diagonal of the square system, keeping the original stems too...
The Seventh triptichon 3
100x100 cm
oil on canvas
1991
The Seventh 1991 (triptichon, oil on canvas, 100x100 cm each) ...Thus the image becomes mirror-symmetric in respect of this diagonal axis. The stems that run down in the first unit, now run also to the right, and the stems running up in the first unit now run also to the left. The third unit of the triptichon is a further extension of the first two. It is obtained from the second unit by a four-fold rotation of its right up quarter around the center of the squares. All the five stems run in all the four perpendicular directions. At the first unit they all run out of the inner squares at those right sides, now the choice of the right up quarter to be rotated gives a balance to the image by stems running alternating from the right and left sides of the inner squares. While the second unit is mirror symmetric, this third unit displays a four-fold rotational symmetry. (György Darvas, 4 March 2011)