Kerry Mitchell

Vice President
Mosaic Arts Center
Avondale, AZ USA
My work is composed primarily of computer generated, mathematically-inspired, abstract images. I draw from the areas of geometry, fractals and numerical analysis, and combine them with image processing technology. The resulting images powerfully reflect the beauty of mathematics that is often obscured by dry formulae and analyses.

An overriding theme that encompasses all of my work is the wondrous beauty and complexity that flows from a few, relatively simple, rules. Inherent in this process are feedback and connectivity; these are the elements that generate the patterns. They also demonstrate to me that mathematics is, in many cases, a metaphor for the beauty and complexity in life. This is what I try to capture.
Kolakoski Spirolateral
16" high x 20" wide
Digital print on aluminum panel
2013
This image is a generalization of the spirolateral concept. It was drawn using 50,000 terms of the self-referential Kolakoski sequence: 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, ... A "1" in the sequence meant to turn left by 179 degrees and draw a segment 1 unit long. A "2" meant to turn right by 179 degrees and draw a segment 1 unit long.
Batman
6" high x 18" wide
Digital print on aluminum panel
2013
This image is a generalization of the spirolateral concept. It was drawn using 21 iterations of the Fibonacci word. The first iteration is "0" and the second is "1". Each subsequent iteration concatenates the previous two. A "0" in the sequence meant to turn left by 170 degrees and draw a segment 1 unit long. A "1" meant to turn right by 170 degrees and draw a segment 1 unit long. The resulting pattern has structures reminiscent of bats, hence the title.
4 x 5
20" high x 16" wide
Digital print on aluminum panel
2013
This image is a generalization of the spirolateral concept. It was drawn using 400 points of the base-100 digit sum sequence. This sequence is the sum of the digits of the positive integers expressed in base 100. Each term of the sequence corresponds to a left turn of approximately 144 degrees and drawing a segment whose length is the value of the term. The title reflects the four sets of five-pointed stars, as well as the width:height ratio of the image.