Marcella Giulia Lorenzi

Artist - Researcher. From 2013 Director of Centro Editoriale e Librario (University of Calabria Press)
University of Calabria
Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Italy
As is well known “Photography” - from Greek “Photos” (light) and “Graphos” (painting) - means “drawing with the light”. Although a photograph is an essentially 2-dimensional object, a picture obtained by a photographic process may evoke also different dimensions, from the linear one to 3-dimensional and even 4-dimensional shapes, if not higher…up to Infinity.
Motion is, in fact, the essence of Life and adding motion to Photography allows, through a skillful use of Digital Cameras, to include one or more extra dimensions, either enhancing or hiding symmetries and asymmetries that might be present or secluded in the original subject. The two images selected represent an ideal sequence, centered around the notion of “circular symmetry”, in which the perceived dimension passes from a one-dimensional curve to a two-dimensional surface ideally preluding to a three-dimensional environment or to infinitelly many extra dimensions...
Peano’s Center of Attraction
40x50 cm
Digital photography
2008
A one-dimensional line, light against dark, springs up and expands from an attraction center. As far as radius increases, the circular lines become closer and closer to each other, up to fill half of the square like a “Peano-like circular curve”. This one-dimensional object tends therefore to fill up the two dimensions of space, preserving the circular symmetry. The original static subject was a discrete set of light sources forming a nest of pointed squares over the ceiling of a hotel in Aveiro (Portugal).
Circular Asymmetry – Big Bang
40x50 cm
Digital photography
2008
Also this two-dimensional multicolored surface seems to spring up from a center, hidden in a central Black-Hole. It evokes, in a sense, the Big-Bang of the Universe. As in the Big-Bang, rotational symmetry is perceived at a first sight, but a closer analysis shows that the Symmetry is in fact broken by local asymmetries, made more evident by the different colors and wavy shapes of the nested rings of growth.