János Szász SAXON

Artist
Poly-Universe Ltd
Magyarország
The constructivist geometric artists, including me, work with geometric forms. While working, it often happens that if we place geometrical elements of varying size or proportion, but of similar form, on a sheet of paper, our eyes will perceive the connections between large, small and even smaller elements in perspective. We perceive the starry sky, the plane projection of the Cosmos perceptible for us, in a similar way, where we see the nearer celestial bodies bigger, the further-away ones smaller. In reality the bodies that look bigger may not be bigger than the others. In our present experiment, however, the plane forms, i.e. those trapped in two dimensions, possess the parameters which correspond to their actual scale
Galaxy 3
60x60 cm
inkjet on paper
2004-2014
The question arises, what happens if we connect and combine the same forms? Take the poly-dimensional square – the most abstract geometric form – as a starting point. Two skale invariant squares can be set in 64 ways next to each other, so that we consider the different number of the sides, since a square can be put on the plan in eight ways. In case of 16 squares we consider the square arrangement next to each other as closed configuration. If we require only the entire side join, then the number of the different possibilities can be given by the following formula: 16! • 8on16 = 20922789888000 • 281474976710656 ≈ 5,9 • 10on27.
Galaxy 6
60x60 cm
inkjet on paper
2004-2014
We can see that it is a system creating itself on the basis of its own laws – perspective ceases to be effective, and we arrive at new structures constituted by the different forms attached to one another. During the past thirty years, studying these basic geometrical shapes (the square) I have named these image structures Galaxies.
Galaxy 8
60x60 cm
inkjet on paper
2004-2014
The Galaxy systems based on their own laws queried the individual creative principle, and do I gave up the didactics of mathematics since as an artist, I had not only logical but aesthetic construction requirements as well. After this my works of art became so-called condensed pictures, universal event-figures, since it is physically impossible to represent all the stations in the infinite process. With proper respect, I can emphasize or rearrange certain parts without causing harm to the essence; thought will then glide out anyway, skipping on the biggest or smallest element of the open system.