Alan Singer

Professor, School Of Art
Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, New York
I am engaged in a hybrid art that includes a sense of form in space, specifically mathematical forms visualized with the help of software
such as 3-D Xplormath, Cinderella.2, and K 3-D Surf. I create forms from equations, and then arrange these shapes as one would do with a collage.
Finally all of the images are combined with Photoshop, and I hand print the images on moist Fabriano paper under the pressure of an etching press. These are all hand pulled one-of-a-kind monoprints.
Farms and artists
16" x 16"
Transfer monoprint and watercolor on Fabriano paper
2008
I began to experiment with implicit surfaces after seeing examples presented at R.I.T. by Richard Palais who demonstrated 3-D Xplormath
in the Mathematics building. I made hundreds of forms using my own parameters, then saved them and worked with them in Photoshop.
Not only did I learn a lot about math, but I felt I was creating forms new to visual art. I would put these forms together in a landscape space, and give them theatrical lighting, and finally print out the results on my etching press.
Chains are Broken
12" x 13.75"
Watercolor and digital transfer monoprint on Fabriano paper
2010
The forms are developed using mathematical visualization tools such as 3-D Xplormath, and K 3-D Surf. Once the images are developed I put them together in a landscape that is also mathematically configured. The only element in this composition which was not completed on the computer is the sky which is in watercolor. All of the forms are then transferred onto moist paper under the pressure of my etching press.
Golden Hours
11.5" x 17"
Watercolor and Transfer monoprint
2012
For this image I found a useful tool in the software called Knot Plot, as well as using k 3-D Surf to create implicit surfaces which I then arranged in a landscape entirely created through mathematical calculation. I am even learning to control the lighting using numerical controls for mixtures and beginning to understand the color palette of RGB ( it is like theatrical lighting ).