Sharol Nau

Artist
Northfield, Minnesota
A classical calculus problem, the so-called Paper Creasing Problem, deals with extremizing the length of the crease formed when a rectangular sheet of paper is altered by folding one corner, say the lower right-hand corner, to the opposite edge. The length of the crease depends on the distance the active corner is from the upper left-hand corner. Using this distance as the variable, the problem naturally divides into several sub-domains, in which the maximizing and minimizing points may occur at interior or endpoints depending upon the dimensions of the sheet.
Longest Crease J
10x10x10 inches
Book Sculpture
2013
This sculpture formed by folding individual pages is an example of the variety of the three-dimensional forms which can be obtained by incremental changes in the length of the crease from page to page and by extending the points that can be used.
Longest Crease K
11x10x10 inches
Book Sculpture
2013
This sculpture is also formed by folding individual pages. It provides another example of the variety of the three-dimensional forms which can be obtained by incremental changes in the length of the crease from page to page