David Freeman and David Hartz

Assistant Professor of Mathematics
University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College
Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Growing up, I always thought that I would pursue a career in the visual arts. However, my vocational pursuits took an unexpected turn when I decided to become a double major in math and visual art as an undergraduate student. I subsequently obtained a PhD in math while putting my artistic pursuits on hold for a number of years. At present, I am exploring ways in which I can return to the creation of visual art equipped with my experience as a researcher in the fields of Geometric Function Theory and Metric Geometry. The works submitted to the Bridges Exhibit were created in collaboration with David Hartz, Associate Professor in the Electronic Media Communications Department at the University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College.
Approximation 1
15 x 15 cm
Mixed media on paper
2015
Memories can serve as guideposts to wandering thoughts. They shine as beacons in the midst of a cloudy past. In order to preserve a memory for the purpose of future reference, we often extract essential feelings, sights, and sounds, thus producing a stylized representation of what actually occurred. The finite symmetry and repetitive coloring of the overlapping hypotrochoid curves in our image represent the process of meditating upon a memory until it forms a fixture in our minds. The sharply defined curves provide a reference point of light amidst a dim and ill-defined landscape of what has been forgotten. The rational numbers inherent in their geometry provide a finitely comprehensible approximation of unseen irrational numbers.
Approximation 2
15 x 15 cm
Mixed media on paper
2015
Memories tend to merge with the passage of time. Multiple events can coalesce into a layered recollection. The overlapping hypotrochoid curves in our image represent the same ratio of integers, and a soft light emanates from within their shared intersection. However, the harmonious qualities of the two curves are contrasted by the subtle Moiré dissonance produced by their differing proportions and placements. These numerical and visual observations invite the viewer to contemplate the uncoordinated conjoining of their own memories.
Approximation 3
15 x 15 cm
Mixed media on paper
2015
Even the brightest memories fade with time. Events of the past can only be approximated by mental reconstructions. Our image draws a parallel between the imprecise nature of meditations upon distant memories and the numerical process of approximating irrational numbers with a sequence of rational numbers. The hypotrochoid curve simultaneously represents both an obscurely happy memory and a concrete ratio of integers approximating an unknown irrational number.