Faye E. Goldman

Origami Artist and Teacher
Ardmore, Pennsylvania,USA
I have been doing origami since elementary school. I was drawn to modular origami by its structure and mathematical properties. This is the medium in which I generally work. More recently, I found the Snapology technique by H. Strobl, which allows great creativity with very few rules using only strips of material. I like to use beautiful ribbon which seems to add another dimension to my work. Snapology has allowed me to dig deeply into mathematical shapes. It has provided insights into mathematical concepts and ideas. I recently published ‘Geometric Origami’ which explains the technique. The bottom line is that I make these wonderful works because they look really cool.

Seven Sided Seven Color Torus
27 x 27 x 7 cm
Strips of polypropylene ribbon
2014
This toroid shape is made from over 3200 strips of Japanese ribbon.
I love the fact that there needs to be as many heptagons making the negative curvature in the center as there are pentagons around the outside. This is the fourth torus I’ve made and mathematically the most interesting. When I decided to create a seven sided torus, it was obvious that it needed to have seven colors to show the seven color map problem on a torus. Each of the seven regions touches the other six.
Brown and Green Egg-163
13 x 10 x 10 cm
Strips of polypropylene ribbon
2013
Loosely defined, a 'Buckyball' is a polyhedron made of pentagons and hexagons with every vertex of degree three (three edges meeting). Buckyballs must have exactly twelve pentagons. I enjoy creating Buckyballs and their duals. I discovered that if you rearranged the twelve pentagons in a semi-regular pattern you could get interesting shapes. Thus began my series of eggs.
Orange and Green Egg-113
10 x 8 x 8 cm
Strips of polypropylene ribbon
2012
Loosely defined, a 'Buckyball' is a polyhedron made of pentagons and hexagons with every vertex of degree three (three edges meeting). Buckyballs must have exactly twelve pentagons. I enjoy creating Buckyballs and their duals. I discovered that if you rearranged the twelve pentagons in a semi-regular pattern you could get interesting shapes. Thus began my series of eggs.