Jonathan Thompson

Graduate Student
Department of Art, Towson University
Towson, Maryland, USA
I first came across fractals when I was researching artists for a curating assignment in one of my graduate courses at Towson University. During my research, I found several artists who used fractal-generating software such as Incendia to generate three-dimensional models. Fractals can exist as rendered images, 3d objects, musical scores, and generally cannot be represented by classical geometry. I began to see potential for integrating these fractals into my design practice. I explored various fractal programs for over three months before integrating elements of this fractal geometry into my artwork. Then I began adding these interesting, yet, complex features and forms to my work, expanding the visual language within my designs.
SQ3473
38 x 38 cm
Giclée art print on natural archival paper using Epson K3 archival inks
2014
The source of my inspiration stems from fractals and the book "Symmetry and Chaos" by M. Field & M. Golubitsky. I used a program called Square Quilts to create a small Bitmap image from fractal equations. Then I used image-editing software to make a high quality image by adjusting its color, contrast, composition, and resolution. I also used Photoshop to apply filters and textures along with pixel replacements and color palate adjustments to create a new image. These images connect to math through the use of Fractal equations, which gives me a starting point in the process of creating each print. The final result is an entirely new image that is one of a kind. They are randomly generated and, therefore, can never be repeated.
SQ10
38 x 38 cm
Giclée art print on natural archival paper using Epson K3 archival inks
2014
Star Burst
38 x 38 cm
Giclée art print on natural archival paper using Epson K3 archival inks
2014