Felicia Tabing

Lecturer
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, California, USA
I created a series of block prints that are inspired by Lomanaco and Kauffman's knot tilings. These are created with hand-carved blocks that when printed by hand, inevitable overlap. I print these by hand because the nature of human error shows through in these prints and in my eyes makes it more interesting than if I made these same images perfect on a computer. Through making these series of prints, I explored the question of how to fill in dimensions of space with knot projections and how this limits the number of crossings, and also how to create symmetry with knots in a given dimensions.
Rustic
50 x 64 cm
Block Print, Ink and Paper
2018
This block print is inspired by Lomonaco and Kauffman’s knot mosaics. Going with my previous series of knot prints featuring an ink gradient, this one features a black and white gradient inspired by optical art. The design stemmed from demonstrating the six permutations of three strands to form a braid in the top left corner as the braid moves to the right. The design was then modified to include a figure-eight knot and a trefoil knot linked together as a Hopf-link, to demonstrate the two simplest knots and link. The print starts in the top left corner chaotic; in color, the braid strands, and print quality. Moving to the bottom right corner, the print becomes more calm and regular.
Lavender Knot
50 x 64 cm
Block Print, Ink and Paper
2018
This block print is of a 24-crossing knot inspired by Lomonaco and Kauffman’s knot mosaics, printed from a four-block set that I carved of knot-tiling projections. In reference to nautical knots, the knot strands on the blocks are styled as rope, which when printed, features the paper showing through the ink. This particular knot was designed to have a large number of crossings that fills in the space with at least one strand per block. The knot has rotational symmetry that is slightly imperfect when rotated 180 degrees. The block print was printed with gradient inks that changes from white and green to lavender and green as the blocks radiate outwards toward the border, so the title of the piece references the colors of the lavender plant.