Jiangmei Wu

Assitant Professor of Design
School of Art, Architecture, + Design, Indiana University, Bloomington
Bloomington, Indiana
I work in the overlapping space of art, design, mathematics, technology, and engineering by exploring the conceptual grounds, the geometric and tectonic forms, the mathematical understandings, and the material applicability of origami and origami-inspired design. In particular, I am interested in how to explore folding through spatial art installations, how to invent new folding designs based on mathematical understandings, how to digitally fabricate these new designs and structures in various materials (not necessarily paper), and most importantly, I am interested in exploring how these aspects work together within the conceptual and physical spaces in which they occur.
Butterfly
28 x 35 x 14 cm
Tinted Mi Teinites Paper
2019
Butterfly belongs to a new class of infinite bi-foldable polyhedral complexes that are the result of a collaboration between the artist and mathematician Matthias Weber. There are three vertex types: valency 4, 6, and 8. Butterfly is named after the vertex of valency 8 as it resembles a symmetrically balanced butterfly. This vertex is translated to create the triply periodic construction. Butterfly is made using a polyhedral weaving technique that employs a four-color complementary scheme. Each color represents a distinctive zone using the concept of zonohedron proposed by H.S.M. Coxeter. Each face is alternated and interwoven by two zones of two colors. A few deviations from the regularity are inserted to create the rhythmic changes.
Dos Equis
25 x 30 x 13 cm
Tinted Mi Teinites Paper
2019
Dos Equis belongs to a new class of infinite bi-foldable polyhedral complexes that are the result of a collaboration between the artist and mathematician Matthias Weber. There are three vertex types in Dos Equis: two of valency 4 and one of valency 8. Dos Equis is named after the vertex of valency 8 as it resembles the image of an X. Using a four-color complementary scheme, each color represents a distinctive zone using the concept of zonohedron proposed by H.S.M. Coxeter. Each zone, using two unique unit patterns, is then folded and interwoven with other zones. Notice that the four colored zones, with its two unit patterns, and its under or over weaving alternations, create a total of sixteen design variations for the quadrilateral faces.