Tim Locke

Mechanical Engineer
Cumberland, RI, USA
I'm interested in geometric ornament from various historic cultures. Specifically, designs that include symmetry and interlacing. By utilizing 3D CAD software, I am able to create designs with a high degree of accuracy and perfect symmetry. My designs are most often controlled by mathematical equations and geometric relationships (tangency, concentricity, etc...). I try to write the equations so that the overall look of the design is controlled by a single numeric variable. By changing the variable, I go through many iterations, until I arrive at a design that is aesthetically pleasing. My recent work attempts to adapt two-dimensional line drawings into three-dimensional objects through the use of CAD technology and direct metal print manufacturing.
Nucleus
ø9" x 3/16" thick
Stainless Steel & Bronze (Direct Metal Print)
2012
Adapted from a book entitled "Ornament: Classically Composed Structures" by Russian artist Yakov Chernikhov. It consists of four concentric, interlacing bands in an openwork style. This design is built upon an underlying sketch of tangent and concentric arcs. I added features using rotational symmetry to give the illusion of interlacing. This design is controlled by a single numeric variable, through the use of geometric relationships and mathematical equations. I changed the variable, through iteration, until the desired aesthetic was achieved. Designed using 3D CAD software (Autodesk Inventor). Manufactured by direct metal print technology (ExOne Company), patinated and hand finished.
Starburst
ø9" x 3/16" thick
Stainless Steel & Bronze (Direct Metal Print)
2012
Adapted from a book entitled "Pattern in Islamic Art" by David Wade. It consists of two sharp-angled, interlacing bands in an openwork style. This design, like most Islamic geometric art, is built upon an underlying sketch of circles and lines arranged in a symmetric pattern. I terminated the bands to transform the pattern into an ornament. I added features using rotational symmetry to give the illusion of interlacing. This design is controlled by a single numeric variable, through the use of geometric relationships and mathematical equations. I changed the variable, through iteration, until the desired aesthetic was achieved. Designed using 3D CAD software (Autodesk Inventor). Manufactured by direct metal print technology (ExOne Company), patinated and hand finished.